FOOD

Themes Key Findings

2016 Food & Beverage

The companies' average overall score across the benchmark methodology's seven themes, which were selected to capture the key areas where companies need to take action to eradicate forced labor from their supply chains: commitment and governance; traceability and risk assessment; purchasing practices; recruitment; worker voice; monitoring; and remedy. There are a total of 22 indicators across the seven themes. For each theme a company can score a total of 100 points.

31

Overall Score 2016 Food & Beverage
14 Theme Score

Summary of Results

As the second lowest-scoring theme and one that is critical to reducing instances of forced labor in supply chains, this is an area where the industry needs to significantly improve. Although over half of the companies (11 out of 20) state that they have a grievance mechanism that is available to suppliers, none of the companies disclose how they ensure the mechanism is proactively communicated to suppliers' workers. Nestlé is the only company which provided an example of engaging workers outside of the context of the workplace on their labor rights. Nestlé further uses the Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit (SMETA) protocol, which outlines that, in a case of regulatory constraints regarding freedom of association, the employer facilitates the development of parallel means for independent and free association and bargaining. The only other company which has developed a policy for its suppliers to address restrictions of freedom of association is Wilmar.

Communication of Policies

The company communicates its human trafficking and forced labor policies and standards to supply chain workers in their native languages.

The company: (1) communicates its human trafficking and forced labor policies and standards to workers in its supply chain. (2) makes its policies and standards available in the languages of suppliers' workers.

Low: 0
High: 50
22

Worker Voice

The company engages with workers outside of the context of the factories in which they work, either directly or in partnership with stakeholders.

The company: (1) has initiatives to engage with workers outside of the context of the factories in which they work, either directly or in partnership with stakeholders

Low: 0
High: 100
5

Worker Empowerment

Where there are regulatory constraints on freedom of association, the company encourages suppliers to ensure workplace environments in which workers are able to pursue alternative forms of organizing.

The company: (1) where there are regulatory constraints on freedom of association, encourages suppliers to ensure workplace environments in which workers are able to pursue alternative forms of organizing.

Low: 0
High: 50
5

Grievance Mechanism

The company has an accessible, formal grievance mechanism that facilitates the impartial reporting by suppliers' workers of workplace grievances and informs workers as to how to access the mechanism. Measures are taken to ensure that the impacted stakeholders trust the mechanism.

The company: (1) has formal procedure that allows suppliers' workers to report a grievance to an impartial entity. (2) demonstrates that the mechanism is made accessible to workers in the supply chain (e.g. its available in workers language). (3) ensures that the existence of the mechanism is proactively communicated to suppliers' workers. (4) takes steps to ensure that impacted stakeholders trust the mechanism (e.g. workers who report a grievance can do so without the fear of penalty, dismissal or reprisal of any kind).

Low: 0
High: 80
24

Worker Voice: Leading Practice

Nestlé

Nestlé partners with third party organizations to carry out community engagement and interviews to assess the potential impact of the farm or factory operations present in Nestlé Supply Chains. Among other things, those partnerships enable the company to identify "root causes of human trafficking" through community engagement and empowerment activities at the village level.

Recommended Action

Worker Empowerment

Translate policy-level commitments to freedom of association into practice by taking steps to ensure that workers in the supply chain are able to organize, especially in contexts where there are regulatory obstacles (often the case for migrant workers).