ICT

Themes Key Findings

2018 Information & Communications Technology

The 40 ICT companies were assessed across the benchmark's seven themes, which were developed to capture the key areas where companies need to take action to eradicate forced labor from their supply chains: commitment; traceability and risk assessment; purchasing practices; recruitment; worker voice; monitoring; and remedy. There are a total of 23 indicators across the seven themes. For each theme a company can score a total of 100 points.

32

Overall Score 2018 Information & Communications Technology
55 Theme Score

Summary of Results

Commitment and governance was the highest scoring theme of the benchmark. Companies made strong statements of commitment to address forced labor in their supply chains, with 35 out of 40 companies publishing such a commitment. Similarly, most companies engage with multi-stakeholder initiatives on forced labor and have training programs in place on forced labor risks.

Thirty-six out of 40 companies disclose having a supply chain standard that prohibits forced labor; twenty-nine of them explain how they communicate that standard to their suppliers. These results show an improvement since KnowTheChain's 2016 ICT benchmark: ASML, Canon, Keyence, Murata, and SK Hynix have since published a supply chain standard that requires suppliers to adhere to international standards prohibiting forced labor. Amphenol, BOE, Largan Precision, and Microchip Technology have not yet disclosed a publicly available supply chain standard.

Disclosure on oversight and implementation of policies on forced labor was relatively strong. Twenty-eight out of 40 companies described a team, program, or officer that is responsible for supply chain standards on forced labor or other anti-trafficking policies. Detail on board-level oversight, however, was rarely disclosed; six out of 40 companies gave some information on a board member or committee that has oversight of policies and standards on forced labor.

The majority of companies disclose training for their employees on their policies relating to human trafficking and forced labor. More than half of companies (22 out of 40) also report delivering training to their suppliers on their policies on forced labor. Some companies refer to training carried out in collaboration with other companies in the sector, or with expert organizations such as the human rights non-governmental organization, Shift. Only seven companies provided supplier training across different supply chain contexts (tiers or countries). Leading companies are training both suppliers and labor agents in their supply chains, in high-risk countries or where suppliers are known to hire vulnerable groups of workers such as students or migrant workers.

Disclosure on stakeholder engagement on the issue of human trafficking and forced labor was poor. Only eight out of 40 companies disclosed any engagement on the issue forced labor with stakeholders such as policy-makers, workers' rights organizations, or local non-governmental organizations in countries in which their suppliers operate. However, ICT companies more commonly reported membership of multi-stakeholder or industry initiatives which focus on forced labor, such as the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA). Twenty-six out of 40 disclosed participating in initiatives including the Responsible Labor Initiative, the Global Business Coalition against Human Trafficking and the Leadership Group for Responsible Recruitment.

Commitment

The company publicly demonstrates its commitment to addressing human trafficking and forced labor.

The company: (1) has publicly demonstrated its commitment to addressing human trafficking and forced labor.

Low: 0
High: 100
90

Supply Chain Standards

The company has a supply chain standard that requires suppliers throughout its supply chains to uphold workers' fundamental rights and freedoms (as articulated in the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work), including the elimination of forced labor. The standard has been approved by a senior executive, is easily accessible on the company's website, is regularly updated, and is communicated to the company's suppliers.

The company's supply chain standard: (1) requires suppliers to uphold workers' fundamental rights and freedoms (those articulated in the International Labour Organization's Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work), including the elimination of forced labor; (2) has been approved by a senior executive; (3) is easily accessible from the company's website; (4) is updated regularly, following internal review and input from external stakeholders; and (5) is communicated to the company's suppliers.

Low: 0
High: 100
64

Management and Accountability

The company has established clear responsibilities and accountability for the implementation of its supply chain policies and standards relevant to human trafficking and forced labor, both within the company and at the board level.

The company: (1) has a committee, team, program, or officer responsible for the implementation of its supply chain policies and standards that address human trafficking and forced labor; and (2) has tasked a board member or board committee with oversight of its supply chain policies and standards that address human trafficking and forced labor.

Low: 0
High: 100
44

Training

The company has training programs in place to ensure that relevant decision-makers within the company and its supply chains are aware of risks related to human trafficking and forced labor and are effectively implementing the company's policies and standards.

The company undertakes programs which include: (1) the training of all relevant decision-makers within the company on risks, policies, and standards related to human trafficking and forced labor; and (2) the training and capacity-building of suppliers on risks, policies, and standards related to human trafficking and forced labor, covering key supply chain contexts.

Low: 0
High: 100
48

Stakeholder Engagement

The company engages with relevant stakeholders on human trafficking and forced labor. This includes engagement with policy makers, worker rights organizations, or local NGOs in countries in which its suppliers operate, as well as active participation in one or more multi-stakeholder or industry initiatives.

In the last three years, the company has engaged relevant stakeholders by: (1) providing at least two examples of engagements on forced labor and human trafficking with policy makers, worker rights organizations, local NGOs, or other relevant stakeholders in countries in which its suppliers operate, covering different supply chain contexts; and (2) actively participating in one or more multi-stakeholder or industry initiatives focused on eradicating forced labor and human trafficking across the industry.

Low: 0
High: 100
30

Stakeholder Engagement: Notable Example

Intel

Intel reports that it is a founding member of the Responsible Business Alliance's (RBA) Responsible Labor Initiative and an active member of the Initiative's Steering Committee. The company further helps advance the RBA's Supplemental Validated Assessment Process program to strengthen its focus and impact on forced labor, and pilots this new audit protocol.

Recommended Action

Stakeholder Engagement

Companies should consult with local stakeholders such as unions, policy makers, or workers' rights organizations on the issue of forced labor in countries in which suppliers operate.