Tracking Tuna on the Blockchain

A report published last week by Provenance summarizes the work and results of our pilot tracking tuna fish caught in Indonesia: the world’s largest tuna-producing country, where seafood industry practices compromise the wellbeing of environments, wildlife and communities. There is a rallying call from customers, governments, NGOs…

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September 12, 2016
LinkedIn

4-tuna-in-ambon-marketA report published last week by Provenance summarizes the work and results of our pilot tracking tuna fish caught in Indonesia: the world’s largest tuna-producing country, where seafood industry practices compromise the wellbeing of environments, wildlife and communities.

There is a rallying call from customers, governments, NGOs and businesses towards the end of the supply chain, for information about the origin of fish and seafood products. The aim of the pilot is not to demonstrate yet another digital interface, but a solution to the grave need for data interoperability: for tracking items and claims securely, end-to-end, in a highly robust, yet accessible format.

Learn more about the pilot>>